Crime and place for everything
By Susan Kurosawa, The Australian,11 December 2010

LIKE Agatha Christie's Poirot, and her village snoop Miss Marple, Singh has an instinct for solving crimes.
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Encouraging a Global Outlook
Speech by Mr Lui Tuck Yew, Minister of Information, Commmunication and the Arts at the Singapore Literature Prize 2010 awards ceremony, 10 December 2010

Beyond the local market, publishers and writers should explore opportunities in the expanding markets in China, India, Malaysia and Indonesia. Local writers, such as Shamini Flint and James Lee, have gone on to gain recognition and popularity beyond our shores. The anxiety that local content will limit writers to the local market is understandable but unfounded. Works with localised details that bring forth universal themes do retain their appeal in the fiercely competitive global market.
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Ubud Writers Festival
By Katie Hamann, Australina Network, October 2010

The Ubud Writers Festival attracted writers from around the world and gives Indonesian writers an opportunity to showcase their work.
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Children's Book Review: Diary of a Soccer Star
Reviewed by Claire Saxby, Aussie Reviews, September 2010

Diary of a Soccer Star introduces the reader to a nerdy boy who is convinced that he's an absolute loss when it comes to playing soccer. His first game was a disaster and he's convinced things will not improve. His father has written a motivational book and is a walking motivator with a slogan to address any negativity. He encourages his son to continue to train at soccer despite Marcus' reservations. Marcus sees himself as good at maths and bad at soccer. And he thinks that cannot change.
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A Woman of Ideas
By Sarah Minns, goodreading magazine, August 2010

Meet Shamini Flint: lawyer, stay-at-home mum and writer trying to change the world one brilliant idea at a time.


Well Lit: Singh in Sing Sing
By Umapagan Ampikaipakan, New Straits Times, 7 July 2010

The dishevelled, disordered, and discordant Inspector Singh is back and better than ever! Inspector Singh Investigates: The Singapore School of Villainy (fiction) by Shamini Flint 306 pages Piatkus READING Shamini Flint's Inspector Singh novels usually finds one developing an involuntary carpal twitch. Your palms begin to sweat. Your wrists begin to spasm. To tic. You feel your fingers flipping those pages forward, peeping, peeking. Cheating.

Because that is what every good murder mystery should inspire. Impatience.
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9mm: An Interview with Shamini Flint
By Craig Sisterson, Crime Watch, KiwiCrime, 4 June 2010

For the 16th in this regular series of quickfire author interviews, I fired the 9mm questions at Malaysia-born, Singapore-based lawyer-turned-children's author and crime novelist Shamini Flint.
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A Little Flight Reading
By Susan Kurosawa, The Australian, 29 May 2010

SINGAPORE'S Inspector Singh is everything Hercule Poirot is not. He's dishevelled, overweight and sweaty, his clothing frequently spotted with the curry stains of Mrs Singh's excellent cooking. But like Agatha Christie's Poirot, and her village snoop Miss Marple, Singh has an instinct for solving crimes that would otherwise foil the local constabulary.
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Mystery novelist Flint cracks the case
By Susan Kurosawa, The Australian, 29 May 2010By Nury Vittachi, Silkwinds (Silk Air's inflight magazine) May/June 2010

A crime wave has broken out in Asia. But this one is good news. Because the crimes are taking place only on paper and provide entertainment that's entirely legal.
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Ripping through Bali's peace
By Tarun Cherian, Deccan Herald, April 2010

Just months ago, I'd reviewed Inspector Singh Investigates, set in Malaysia. And so when this one, Inspector Singh Investigates in Bali landed up, I snorted, "God how predictable.Is he a cop or travel agent?" Mentally, I continued to fulminate, "Jeez, the author Shamini Flint really has it made. Go on a holiday and milk it for a yarn." So the truth is I started the book in a sarcastic frame of mind, ready to hop on top of Inspector Singh and wallop him with a blunt instrument. Two or three engrossing hours later with Inspector Singh in Bali, and he had won me over again.
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An Inspector Singh calls again and again in brains of authors
By Nury Vittachi, The Standard HK, 23 March 2010

This is a really weird story, but true. Somewhere in the land of fictional characters, there's a Sikh working for the police force. He's a traditionalist, with a beard, turban and pot belly. He likes to present an image of being obsessed with his own carnal needs, but underneath all that, he is actually a first-class detective.
Not for him, all those flashy CSI microscopes. No, a good curry is all he needs to power his investigations.
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Why I Write: Shamini Flint
By JFK Miller, Urbanatomy, Shanghai, 23 February 2010

In 1946, George Orwell wrote an essay entitled Why I Write detailing the forces which compelled him to put pen to paper. In this, our continuing Web series, we talk to authors about their literary habits and reading preferences, and examine Orwell's question which lies at the heart of being an author – why they write
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Inspector Singh sure has zing
By Tarun Cherian, Deccan Herald, January 2010

A classic whodunnit, with an endearing detective, an exotic setting, plots within plots, reasons for murder galore, transnational tensions, parochialism, a breathtakingly pretty suspect, and a wonderful Asian mix of characters. You have a cast full of evil doers — crooked cops, hit men, jilted lovers, corporate raiders, activists. You have a great spread of motives: sex, love, revenge, money, custody issues, control of great estates, dark secrets, rainforest rights.
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Turn over a new leaf
By Susan Kurosawa, 19 December 2009

IT has been a lean year for classic travel narratives. Of the big-gun international writers only Dervla Murphy has offered a new book.

Her The Island that Dared (Eland Books, $49.95) chronicles her journeys -- with and without family, a year apart -- in Cuba and is written with her trademark acuity, fearlessness and honesty.
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Review special: Thrillers and crime
By Geoffrey Vine, 19 December 2009

When Shamini Flint's first novel in the Inspector Singh Investigates series was published, most readers probably found the adventures of the rotund, irascible Sikh detective amusing light reading.
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Too nice a guy?
By K.W. Wong, 15 November 2009

I MUST have been among hundreds of people who were piqued by the message on social networking site Facebook calling all Australians to save some Inspector Singh allegedly trapped on shelves by shelling out A$22.95 (RM73.44) “in ransom money”.

Not being Australian I didn’t think too much of it. But it did put the name “Shamini Flint” into my brain, so when I came across the name on a book in Malaysia, I picked it up, no doubt “rescuing” it, too....
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Shamini Flint: Inspector Singh Investigates: A Bali Conspiracy Most Foul
By Glenn Harper, 1 November 2009

The 2nd Inspector Singh novel to be published by Piatkus Press (and the third overall) is more confident and accomplished than the earlier stories. Singh is a more rounded character (he was pretty one-dimensional in the first of the novels, which is apparently to be reissued in the "Inspector Singh Investigates" series as The Singapore School of Villainy, though its original title was Partners in Crime).
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Talking Books Hits the Road!
By Michelle Martin, 27 October 2009

The Queen of Crime Fiction , Malaysian-born , Singapore-based author Shamini Flint launching her second “Inspector Singh Investigates” book.
I took my radio programme Talking Books out on the road on the 26th of October. It’s great to meet the authors in their “natural settings” doing what they do best, talking about themselves and their books. ( Read Whole Article )
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A life of crime
By Joan Lau, 11 October 2009

Did you read Agatha Christie crime stories growing up? Raised on a diet of Enid Blyton adventures and mysteries courtesy of the Secret Seven and Famous Five (I preferred the Secret Seven), the Agatha Christie books were the perfect bridge for me.

Have no idea what I am on about? What I mean is they were perfect for someone too old for Enid Blyton and too young for some hardboiled crime writer like ... Dashiell Hammett.
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Turbaned detective and hot model wreak havoc in Malaysia
By Lindsay Pereira, 19 September 2009

Shamini Flint's Inspector Singh Investigates is an engaging murder mystery set in the streets of Kuala Lumpur. But is her poor-dressing, heavy-smoking, portly detective going to win over the Indian public?

What Singapore-based Shamini Flint wants to do isn't unusual. "I am determined to change the world," her website proclaims. Her intention of bringing about this change "through writing" isn't path-breaking either. What we want to ask the former lawyer, however, is how her current genre of choice - crime fiction - fits into her scheme. ( Read Whole Article )
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Far from Holmes
By Adrian Turpin, 6 July 2009

In 1998, a professor of medical law at Edinburgh University brought out a novel that seemed to confound the laws of publishing. Alexander McCall Smith’s The No 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency was unfashionably whimsical. Its plump, middle-aged heroine, Precious Ramotswe, “Botswana’s only female detective”, spent as much time dispensing gentle wisdom as she did solving crime. Who exactly was going to buy this eccentric mix of genres? Just how many slightly sentimental, crime-friendly readers with an interest in African life could there be?
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Inspector Singh Investigates: A most peculiar Malaysian murder
PETRONA, Monday 8 June 2009

Inspector Singh is neither young nor slim. Based in Singapore, he is sent to Kuala Lumpur to look into the case of Chelsea Liew, who is on trial for murdering her husband, Alan Lee. Chelsea is from Singapore, so Inspector Singh is charged with representing her interests in a hostile Malaysian legal system.
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THE WRITING LIFE ... Shamini FLINT
eric forbes’s book addict’s guide to good books, Sunday, 05 July 2009

SHAMINI FLINT writes children’s books with cultural and environmental themes including Jungle Blues and Turtle Takes a Trip as well as the Sasha series of children’s books. She also writes crime fiction; the first three books are Inspector Singh Investigates: A Most Peculiar Malaysian Murder, Inspector Singh Investigates: A Bali Conspiracy Most Foul and Inspector Singh Investigates: A Singapore School of Villainy, all published (or to be published) by Piatkus Books, an imprint of Little, Brown in the U.K.
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Inspector Singh Investigates: A Most Peculiar Malaysian Murder
Laura Wilson The Guardian, Saturday 16 May 2009

Down these mean streets a man must waddle ... It's impossible not to warm to the portly, sweating, dishevelled, wheezing Inspector Singh from the start of this delightful debut novel. Sent from his home in Singapore to Kuala Lumpur to act in the interests of Singaporean former model Chelsea Liew, who is on death row for the murder of her ex-husband, Malaysian Alan Lee, Singh knows that he has been handed a poisoned chalice. The Malaysian authorities are convinced that Liew is guilty, and she has a strong motive - wealthy playboy Lee abused her for years and tried to take her children from her - but Singh believes her claim that she is innocent. Flint's thoughtful and compassionate exploration of racial and religious tensions between the two countries is thoroughly compelling.( Read Whole Article ) Back To the Top Get this week's recommended book, 'Inspector Singh Investigates: A Most Peculiar Malaysian Murder’ for only £2.99 at Tesco

The Telegraph is delighted to offer readers a fantastic discount on our ‘Recommended Book of the Week’ in association with Tesco. Each week we recommend a specially selected title for you to purchase at the exclusive price of £2.99. This week you can get ‘Inspector Singh Investigates: A Most Peculiar Malaysian Murder’ by Shamini Flint.
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What a girl wants
Two weeks ago, we spoke of Shamini Flint's crime novels. Her latest book is about a 10-year old girl who wants to play football and as this sort of behaviour does not yet have a law against it, Ten does not qualify as a crime novel.

Yes, it's a children's book! Although it has understandably been a long time since I last touched base with the genre (what do you take me for, some kind of pervert?) this book took me back. ( Read Whole Article ) Back To the Top
Murder, she wrote
- and soon, Insp Singh Investigates ( Read Whole Article )
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Shamini Flint: Writing for a better world
Vennilla Rajaguru, Contributor, Ubud, Bali | Thu, 10/23/2008 10:56 AM | People ( Read Whole Article )
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